Using blender to create sprites...

frida22

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honestly i am wondering if original tibia sprites were made this way, the original ones was also a blurry mess. but it had its charm. like, it wasn't even a pixel art, pixelart you have in the newest venore, but the old one might have been processed in photoshop or blender images xD for me this is another mystery to solve.

Like, look at those sprites
tttttt.png
The right one is definitely a pixel art, but the left one COULD actually be an improved in "gimp" or some kind of editor 3d Render, It would be the same way of creating sprites as in heroes 3.
 
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Garlonk

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honestly i am wondering if original tibia sprites were made this way, the original ones was also a blurry mess. but it had its charm. like, it wasn't even a pixel art, pixelart you have in the newest venore, but the old one might have been processed in photoshop or blender images xD for me this is another mystery to solve.

Like, look at those sprites
View attachment 38335
The right one is definitely a pixel art, but the left one COULD actually be an improved in "gimp" or some kind of editor 3d Render, It would be the same way of creating sprites as in heroes 3.
Most of the original tibia spriters were known in commuities because cip hired fan artists or got them to work for free. none used 3D for sprites as far as i know. Also take into consideration that 3D was way more cumbersome back then and not as widely available.
I personally like the soft "blurry" look over the more cartoony style of modern tibia. It becomes too messy ingame when every pixel describes a form/detail. Implied detail and lost edges are terms that are like never used in pixel art but super common i regular 2D art.
 

Keal Atis

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Cool, but textures are simple. Lizard was much better :D
Anyway, good job!
 
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Sam Drost

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Started sculpting on a troll tonight. Not really based on the trolls found in Tibia, but I couldn't find any reference images, and, personally, I can't tell from the sprites what they are really trying to go for other than biped.

 
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Sam Drost

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Got sidetracked by a different project, but that one is finished so I picked this one back up. I think I have settled on the digitigrade legs.

 

Fox Rother

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@Sam Drost Awesome work you're doing here! Please keep it up! Nowadays the only thing holding the T in OT is CipSoft's sprite collection!
Your technique is getting more and more refined!
 
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Sam Drost

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Thanks. That brings up a question I have. Having not actually played Tibia in years, are sprites still based on 32x32 for most and 64x64 for the big ones, or have they increased the resolution at all, or, more germane to my work, what size sprites does OpenTibiaClient support?
 

Fox Rother

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Thanks. That brings up a question I have. Having not actually played Tibia in years, are sprites still based on 32x32 for most and 64x64 for the big ones, or have they increased the resolution at all, or, more germane to my work, what size sprites does OpenTibiaClient support?
@Sam Drost As far as I know, OTC still supports 32x32 sprites only. I hope I'm wrong, since I believe it to be one of the biggest bottlenecks for setting OT free from T :V
 
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Sam Drost

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I suppose that makes sense. In order to use any other resolution, you would have to start completely from scratch.

Started retopology today. For those of you that don't work with 3D, that is the process of taking a sculpt (on the left) and going over it with new polygons so that you get the same details with fewer polygons.
1570675095092.png
 

Fox Rother

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I suppose that makes sense. In order to use any other resolution, you would have to start completely from scratch.
Yes. And there are some limits to the styles you can convey in such a limited space. Anything that is not isometric also gets a bit clunky.
 
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Sam Drost

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Yes. And there are some limits to the styles you can convey in such a limited space. Anything that is not isometric also gets a bit clunky.
That is not necessarily true, the 8-bit and 16-bit eras had plenty of non-isometric games and very few of them went beyond 16x16 or at most 16x24.
 
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Fox Rother

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That is not necessarily true, the 8-bit and 16-bit eras had plenty of non-isometric games and very few of them went beyond 16x16 or at most 16x24.
Well put. Sorry about that. :p
What I tried to say is that with isometry you can express an idea with less pixels, which is, well... the precise definition of a 32-pixel grid. xD
Also, the lines between cartoon and realistic styles for instance get really blurred (hehehe).
I don't think that's bad, not at all. But the more freedom you give to people, the more likely they are to contribute (and right now I think that'd be really nice).
 
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